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What Persona 5 Does Right

Persona 5 released in 2017 to worldwide acclaim. It propelled the Persona franchise to the global spotlight like never before and has since sold 3.2 million copies, and that number isn’t even taking into account the sales of the remastered version, Persona 5 Royal, released in March of this year. After playing the game twice myself,

How sport has started to become more player-centric

It is relatively standard to be asked who you support, for any given sport, however this question is almost always referring to a specific team rather than a specific player. The biggest sport leagues in the world all connect each team to a particular location,

Peter Ackroyd: Civil War

Unsurprisingly, the Stuart period has been written about extensively; after all, it laid the foundations for modern Britain through political, social and imperial experimentation. In 2014, Peter Ackroyd published his own interpretation of this period as part of his hugely ambitious six book series on

An Article About Not Writing Articles

The amount of free time I’ve had over the past three weeks is abnormally huge because of the coinciding of the quarantine and my Easter term break. Going into the holiday, I had tons of things I thought I could do now that I had

Phillip K. Dick: A Man Before His Time

From his theories about AI to reenvisioned history, Phillip K. Dick was one of the most constantly inventive and complex writers of his time. For many, however, his ideas were too bold and experimental to be considered seriously by America’s elite novelists; like the setting of so many of his stories, Phillip K. Dick was before his time.

Harriet Beecher Stowe: Uncle Tom’s Cabin

Some novels reflect the time in which they are written whilst others contribute to shaping it. Stowe’s novel, the second best-selling of the 1800s following the Bible, does both. The aim of Stowe’s novel is self-evident and phrased by her sister-in-law as ‘mak[ing] this whole

Anthony Burgess: A Clockwork Orange

Anthony Burgess’ novel ‘A Clockwork Orange’ wrestles with the question of what makes us human. More precisely, it asks whether free will is an essential human quality. Burgess poses this question through the vessel of Alex, an extremely violent juvenile who is ultimately deprived of

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