Browse By

Category Archives: Culture

What Persona 5 Does Right

Persona 5 released in 2017 to worldwide acclaim. It propelled the Persona franchise to the global spotlight like never before and has since sold 3.2 million copies, and that number isn’t even taking into account the sales of the remastered version, Persona 5 Royal, released in March of this year. After playing the game twice myself,

James Bailey: The Flip Side

Some things seem just too good to be true, like James Bailey’s debut book being billed as the ‘laugh-out loud romantic comedy of the year’. Is it really possible that an unknown author could be worthy of such accolade? This is what Berkeley Squares set

Adam Burns: American Imperialism

You would be forgiven for not expecting America to have an imperialist past, or indeed present; after all, America’s foundations lie in liberating itself from the chains of imperialism. However, in his debut book published in 2017, Adam Burns, who lectures at the University of

Peter Ackroyd: Civil War

Unsurprisingly, the Stuart period has been written about extensively; after all, it laid the foundations for modern Britain through political, social and imperial experimentation. In 2014, Peter Ackroyd published his own interpretation of this period as part of his hugely ambitious six book series on

Phillip K. Dick: A Man Before His Time

From his theories about AI to reenvisioned history, Phillip K. Dick was one of the most constantly inventive and complex writers of his time. For many, however, his ideas were too bold and experimental to be considered seriously by America’s elite novelists; like the setting of so many of his stories, Phillip K. Dick was before his time.

Harriet Beecher Stowe: Uncle Tom’s Cabin

Some novels reflect the time in which they are written whilst others contribute to shaping it. Stowe’s novel, the second best-selling of the 1800s following the Bible, does both. The aim of Stowe’s novel is self-evident and phrased by her sister-in-law as ‘mak[ing] this whole

Howard Zinn: A People’s History of the United States

The US Constitution, ratified in 1788, begins ‘We the People’, but Howard Zinn’s ‘A People’s History of the United States’ attempts to prove that America as a nation never has been about the people and never will be unless the middle classes are awoken from

Anthony Burgess: A Clockwork Orange

Anthony Burgess’ novel ‘A Clockwork Orange’ wrestles with the question of what makes us human. More precisely, it asks whether free will is an essential human quality. Burgess poses this question through the vessel of Alex, an extremely violent juvenile who is ultimately deprived of

El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie

(Spoilers) This year has seen a string of television shows being given the so-called ‘movie treatment’. Downton Abbey and Deadwood have both been brought back and soon David Chase’s ‘The Many Saints of Newark’ will be released in cinemas. El Camino marks Vince Gilligan revisiting